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When you are getting your classic car ready for a show, or for just a drive around town, you want it to be in showroom condition. Here are our helpful tips for detailing your classic to get in in car show condition.

Chrome trim. Did you know that the oils secreted by your skin can be transferred from your fingers to chrome trim and eventually cause the surface to deteriorate? It’s true! Avoid touching it if you can and if you do leave fingerprints or smudges, use a soft cotton cloth to wipe them off – but don’t use the same rag for other areas on your car. Use a different one for each area and each type of cleaner.

Windshield and windows. If you have stickers or sticker residue on your glass, a little rubbing alcohol will help to dissolve the glue, making it easier to remove. A sharp razor blade can be very effective for sliding under stickers and removing them. Rubbing alcohol also removes tree sap from your glass, chrome, or paint.

Cracks, crevices, and carpet edges. A can of compressed air spray does wonders for getting trash out of small cracks, crevices, and carpet edges. Use it in the cabin, console, under and around seats, and in the trunk.

Upholstery. A little baby powder will remove oil-based stains and great streaks from upholstery. Just sprinkle it on the area, let it sit for about 30 minutes, then use a soft toothbrush or soft nylon brush to dust the powder off. If any powdery residue remains, use the vacuum to get it all up.

Vents and hard to get to areas. If there are any areas that are difficult to get to, like the AC vents or gauge seams, a cotton swab works like a charm. In fact, it works well for any hard to clean area. Just dab a little cleaner or some rubbing alcohol (whichever cleaner you are using for the area) and wipe the gunk away.

Underside of the trunk and hood. To clean these areas, put something over the trunk area or engine to keep the gunk out of it.

Washing the car (yes, there’s a system). First, please for the love of all that is beautiful and right in the world, don’t use dish soap to wash your car! Dish soap is for pots, pans, and dishes, NOT for paint jobs and chrome! That is the quickest way to dull your paint and destroy your clear coat. Getting creamy, thick professional carwash soap with lots of luxurious foam will provide your classic with the luxurious TLC it needs to look awesome.

Next, when you start to wash, start at the top. That way, the grime and dirt are traveling down, and you are washing behind it, not washing into areas you’ve already cleaned.

Finish with the wheels. The tires and wheels are the dirtiest part of the car so you should leave them for last.

Complete your wash with a good rinse chamois dry. Run the water over the entire car for a minute or two. This ensures that all the soap is rinsed away. Afterwards, use a soft leather chamois to buff your car dry. A microfiber towel works well too but leave your bath and hand towels for your shower. They are too harsh for a paint job and will scratch it.

Whether you are looking for a show car or a daily driver, Woodside Credit can help. Our easy terms and low payments make it easier than ever to own that classic or collector car. Visit our website today to find out how we can help you fill your garage.

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Imagine digging around in your garage and finding a million bucks. That would be extremely cool, right?

Now imagine that you find a very valuable, very beautiful item that is worth a cool mil. You get to enjoy the beauty and the cash that follows!

What a deal!

That is exactly what happened recently when a rare 1969 Lamborghini Miura was discovered in a German garage where it was covered in dust and pretty filthy. Someone had placed bricks under the car’s front wheels to keep it from moving.

It was tucked away and forgotten.

The P400 S model is completely original right down to the engine – which has just 18,000 miles on the odometer. Tracing back its history, the vintage Lambo has only had two owners. Walter Becker, a German ad exec, purchased it in 1971 but later sold it to Hans-Peter Weber, an amateur racer.

Weber took exceptionally good care of the car up until his death in 2015. Until then, it was in pristine condition, but each passing year the forgotten wallflower withered a little more with each passing day. Eventually it was just a memory.

When the Miura was uncovered and brought into the light people thought, “Oh, what a pretty little car.” However, the more dust they removed, the closer they looked, they realized what an exceptional jewel they had in their midst.

The Miura S is a rare car, but an all original Miura S is almost unheard of.

In October 2019, this very special Lamborghini rolls onto the auction block at RM Sotheby’s Europe at their London auction. It is expected to command around 1 million pounds – that’s about $1.2 million U.S. dollars.

It’s the ultimate Cinderella story. Well, except that it’s about a car. But oh, what a car it is!

Whether you have your sights set on a vintage Lamborghini or a cool, modern exotic, Woodside Credit has you covered. Our easy terms and low payments let you put that car in your garage. It’s just that simple. Visit our site or call one of our knowledgeable, friendly representatives and make that exotic car fantasy a reality.

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You read every word on the website and painstakingly filled out the entry form. Now you’re all set.

You have just entered your first car show.

Congrats!

Now it’s time to start preparing – and it’s never too early.

The big clean up

Preparing for a car show is not as simple as taking the cover off your classic and driving away. No, that car needs to be in top notch condition.

And that means super clean, inside and out.

The best course of action is to start under the hood. Move on to the wheels next, then tackle the exterior. When you follow this order, you maximize your clean potential. Make sure that there are no water marks or streaks – your displaying a show car now.

Save your interior for last. Vacuum and clean it well, inspecting closely for any tears or loose stitches that may need mending.

It’s a good idea to bring your cleaning supplies with you. It’s always nice to have to ability to do quick touch ups when necessary.

Year-round care for your classic show car

Classic show cars require a little more TLC than other cars. This means giving it extra special care all year round.

The first thing you want to do is protect it, so keeping it in a garage is a good idea. If you can keep it under a car cover, that’s even better. If you don’t drive it often, remove the cover now and then and roll down the windows so that it doesn’t get stale. You can also leave the windows down if you keep the car inside. That will also help.

Once a month, crank it up and take it for a spin. This prevents the engine from becoming corroded and keeps everything is good working order. If for some reason you can’t take it for a drive, at least crank the engine every couple of weeks.

A good pain sealant will keep your paint job in pristine condition. It’s good for about six months at a time, but well worth it, especially if you live in a humid climate where rust is a problem the sealant will help prevent rust.

The classic car show checklist

Before you hit the road, you might want to pack some things from this checklist:

  • Event registration tags
  • Any required paperwork (documentation to verify your car is a certain age, was owned by someone famous, etc.)
  • Cash
  • Information on the car
    • Pictures
    • Awards
    • Documentation
    • Clippings from publications
  • Lights to increase visibility, highlight certain features, etc.
  • Cleaning supplies (microfiber towels, pre-moistened towelettes for quick detail jobs, etc.)
  • Creature comforts
    • Bottled water
    • Snacks
    • Folding chairs
    • Sunglasses
    • Sunscreen
    • Small canopy
    • Tunes
    • Camera
  • Business cards with your contact information

Classic car shows can be a family bonding experience and tons of fun for both kids and adults. If you are looking for a car to take to shows, we can help make it happen. Contact Woodside Credit or visit our site and see how easy it is to own that beautiful classic. See you at the show!

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There’s nothing like a spectacular car crash to get the blood pumping – and the old heart stopping.

If you didn’t feel physical pain when the 1961 Ferrari 250GT in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986) plummeted to the ground below from its cushy little perch in Cameron’s dad’s garage, well, you might not have a soul.

We rounded up a few of the most spectacular (and costly!) exotic car crashes in movies. So, grab your popcorn and settle in for the ride of your life.

Warning: These scenes may be emotionally traumatic for true exotic car lovers.

Spectre (James Bond) 2015
Aston Martin DB10

If you haven’t ever heard of a DB10 it’s because there were only 10 produced by Aston Martin specifically for the movie. And the carmaker has no plans to put it into regular production for sales. All told, it was somewhere in the neighborhood of $37 million dollars in cars that were destroyed during the making of the movie. That’s a pretty fancy neighborhood.

Spectre was the most expensive James Bond movie so far. It also set a Guinness World Record for the largest stunt explosion.

But we just like it for the cars.

Dark Knight (Batman) 2008
Lamborghini Murcielago LP640

Batman crashed a Lambo. Actually, Bruce Wayne crashed the Lambo and while that is a fresh change of pace, to say Batman did it is a little more dramatic. While the late Heath Ledger gave a jaw dropping, stellar performance as the Joker, the Lamborghinis did get their fair share of attention. The Italian carmaker gave the production team three cars to play with and boy did they play.

Buy oh, when that truck sideswipes Wayne’s sleek, stormy beauty, it hurts us all.

Fast and Furious 7 2015
Lykan Hypersport

The first creation of the “Arab maker of automobiles” W Motors, the Lykan Hypersport does not sport a cheap price tag. After all, headlights embedded with 420 diamonds are gonna cost ya. Add to that a production of just 7 cars and you have the stage set for some serious cash – about $3.4 million. For one car.

And the good folks at Fast and Furious crashed one.

Well, sort of. The good news is, the Lykan that was crashed in the movie was not one of the seven in production. The carmaker produced a movie version of the car, build specifically for F&F. It was still a pretty penny, but not as pretty as $3.4 million. Whew!

When it comes to exotic cars, you won’t find a more knowledgeable and experienced lender than the team at Woodside Credit. Classic, Collector, and Exotic car loans are all we do – and we do it better than anyone else in the industry. We offer the best rates and easiest terms. See for yourself just how easy it is to own your own silver screen worthy exotic – and we know you won’t crash yours.

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Your collector classic is probably one of your most prized possessions. So, what happens when you have to transport it? How do you get it from Point A to Point B completely unscathed?

Here are our tips for a worry-free transport.

Broker or Carrier?

When you want to ship your classic car, you have two choices: a broker or a carrier. A broker will take your order and then assign it to a company or individual for transport. Your deposit is their commission and they are a middleman in the transaction. They have no part in the actual shipping of your car. If you go this route, keep that in mind.

A carrier, on the other hand, is a company that owns its own equipment such as trucks and trailers. When you contact a carrier, you are speaking to a representative of the company that will be transporting your vehicle. For many collectors, this is the preferable transport method.

Choose the Right Company

One of the best ways to find a good car transport company is to talk to people who have shipped their classic cars. Other collectors, car restorers, big auction companies, car club members, and even museums are great resources who can point you to a car shipping company that will handle your car right.

When you are checking out a car transport company, consider these points:

  • Check the company’s insurance status, company type (carrier or broker), and safety record at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.
  • Check the company’s profile at the Better Business Bureau
  • Check several review sites or classic car forums to see what actual customers have to say
  • Pay attention to how long they have been in business, if the company was under any different names, as well as background and experience

Price isn’t Everything

When you are looking for a company to transport your collector car, don’t make your selection based on price alone. The professional equipment needed to safely ship your car, is very expensive. Most reputable car carriers will have similar prices. When you see a company with a much lower price, don’t jump on it. It should e a red flag.

Transport Specifics

The equipment that your transport company uses could mean the difference between your car arriving at its destination without a scratch and not faring so well. Nylon straps and wheel nets will protect your car. Steer clear of companies that use chains or don’t use straps properly.

You also need to decide whether you want an open trailer or an enclosed carrier. An open trailer is usually less expensive, but an enclosed carrier is safer and there is less of a chance that your car will be damaged.

If your car isn’t running, let your carrier know. Some companies charge fees for non-running cars – and they can get prices. Lay it all out there up front so you don’t have any nasty surprises when you are ready to ship.

Tips for Preparing Your Classic for Transport

When you are preparing your classic car for transport, follow these guidelines:

  • Make sure it is clean inside and out
  • Remove everything from the trunk and inside the vehicle
  • Be present at the inspection by the carrier so each dent, scratch, and imperfection is documented
  • Take photos of your car from all angles
  • Give your driver written instructions regarding operating your car (especially if it is not straightforward) and any other information they need to know such as hidden switches, fuel cut off switches, tricks to starting the car, and alarm instructions
  • Make sure your battery is fully charged
  • Most carriers recommend that your fuel tank only be half full
  • Check the fluid levels, especially antifreeze to ensure that it is adequate for protecting the car in its destination climate

At Woodside Credit, we have the easiest terms and best rates in the business. Whether you are buying your car from a seller across town or across the country, we can help you put that little beauty in your garage quickly and easily. Apply for a loan or call and speak to one of our knowledgeable, friendly team members to find out how we can help you.

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There are some interesting changes in the collector car market in 2019. If you are looking to make an investment for a little profit, a lot of fun, or a bit of both, read this first.

It’s a buyer’s market.

Buyers are becoming more discerning than ever and this means that the standards are rising. With the buyers calling the shots there is a demand for better, well maintained cars in good condition. Cars with serious issues or even cars that are just average are no longer passing the muster. They are being pushed aside in favor of better quality. This alone is transforming the market with more million dollar purchases – and beyond.

Japanese cars and restomods are enjoying a surge in popularity.

Japanese imports and restomods (professionally built) are becoming more in demand than ever. Japanese classics are really finding firm footing in the market, commanding six figures and even more. Then again, Barrett-Jackson predicted this some time ago. Limited production models always have a strong showing.

Buyers are purchasing more for love than profit.

Several years ago, buyers were picking up collector cars as money making investments. That trend has been slowly shifting and now buyers are selecting collector cars simply for the love of the automobile. Sometimes they want to add to their personal collection. Other times they are purchasing their dream car. Money is no longer the primary motivator.

New tax laws are having an impact on collector car sales.

The end of the 1031 exchange tax benefit for cars has caused the selling and trading of collector cars to slow significantly. Sellers who have a large gain are not as likely to sell because they will have to pay capital gains taxes. It is not cost effective for them to replace their vehicles.

1960 and 1970 SUVs are resonating with younger buyers.

These vehicles have several pluses in their corner. They are familiar, they look cool, and they are great for customization projects (another hot trend). This makes them appealing to Millennials and those on the younger end of Gen X.

Prewar and Brass-era cars are popular among older collectors.

While younger collectors are growing in numbers, the older, more established collectors are still market leaders. Collectors that are 55, 65, even up to 80 are gravitating to the prewar cars and some Brass-era. They are like the fine wine of collector cars.

Ready to jump into the market and invest in a car to add to your collection? Let Woodside Credit help you make it happen. Exotic, classic, and collector car loans is what we do. In fact, its all we do. That’s why our experts are some of the best in the business and can help you at every point of the lending process. Give us a call and see for yourself what a difference experience and expertise make.

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“Bond, James Bond.” Who doesn’t know those three iconic words? For nearly 60 years Mr. Bond has been uttering those words and ordering his martini “shaken, not stirred.”

But that isn’t all that the James Bond franchise is known for. In fact, there is something else that is closely watched and highly anticipated.

The cars. Fantastic, gorgeous classic cars that spark the imagination and get the blood pumping.

From the Sunbeam Alpine in 1962’s Dr. No, Bond’s first appearance, to the anticipatory buzz about his upcoming, tentatively titled Bond 25 (is he driving an electric Aston Martin or a less glamorous Land Rover?), these movies have provided entertainment and excitement for several generations.

Let’s take a look at some of the automotive gifts that the James Bond movies have bestowed upon us over the years.

Aston Martin DB5
Movies: GoldfingerThunderballGoldenEye, Tomorrow Never Dies, Casino Royale, Skyfall

It wasn’t the first James Bond car; it didn’t make it’s first appearance until 1964 Goldfinger. However, the Aston Martin DB5 is definitely the best known. In fact, it’s considered the most famous car in the world. Fun fact: Aston was not exactly thrilled about loaning a development prototype for the movie. There wasn’t even any deal for product placement, but after the windfall of publicity that followed the Goldfinger release, they changed their tune. This set the stage for placement deals throughout the industry and is a main reason they are use today.

BMW Z8
Movie: The World is not Enough

This was not the first BMW that Bond drove (you might recall the brief glimpse of the BMW Z3 in GoldenEye), but it was one of the more popular ones. The classic beauty packed 400 horses and while not as gadget laden as some other Bond cars, it did have its high points. You gotta love a car that has little steering wheel controlled missiles that pop out of its side gills.

Lotus Esprit Turbo
Movie: For Your Eyes Only

This Bond car did not get much screen time – not as much as many of the other Bond cars – but it still stands out as one of the most memorable. Aside from some pretty cool gadgets, it’s the sheer beauty of this car that really captured imaginations. The deep red paint job, brilliant graphics, and shiny gold wheels are definitely dream worthy. Who didn’t fantasize about slipping behind that wheel and hitting the open road?

Mercury Cougar XR-7
Movie: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service

OK, so this was not a car driven James Bond (Tracy di Vincenzo did all the driving), but it is still a memorable James Bond car just the same. This jaw dropping classic, a 1969 Cougar XR-7, had no gadgets, but then again, it didn’t need them. This little beauty stood on her own two feet, or, er, four wheels.

Aston Martin DBS
Movies: Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace

Casino Royale did more than showcase the DBS as a totally cool ride, it was also a testament to the Aston Martin reputation for durability and precise handling. In one epic car chase scene Bond was supposed to flip the DBS seven times before crashing. That was the plan anyway.

No matter what the stuntmen did they could not get the DBS to lose control on such a spectacular way. The car simply handled too well. Finally, the crew used a compressed air canon, tucked behind the driver seat. When the time came for the “big scene,” the cannon would fire a cylinder into the road. Boom. The results were some of the most memorable in James Bond history.

Toyota 2000GT Roadster
Movie: You Only Live Twice

One of the great moments in James Bond history is the fancy driving through the streets of Tokyo in a Toyota 2000GT roadster. The only problem was Toyota did not sell such a car. In fact, the carmaker intended to sell its very first sports car as a cute little coupe. This put a kink in movie crew’s plans because it would make it a real challenge to do any in car filming.

To add insult to injury, Sean Connery, who stood at 6’2” couldn’t fit in it.

The final solution was to convert a couple of coupes into roadsters. Problem solved – sort of. At least it looked great on screen.

Channel your inner James Bond and get your own uber cool ride. Woodside Credit makes it easy with the lowest payment terms in the industry. Give us a call today or visit our site and review our loan programs so you can put that car in your garage.

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It’s that time again. As summer draws near it’s time to start planning vacations and day trips. We’ve put together a list of some of the biggest car shows that will be delighting attendees this summer. You may want to plan accordingly so you can take in an event or two.

The Elegance at Hershey

June 7-8, Friday – Sunday
Hershey, Pennsylvania

You probably already know that the town of Hershey is famous for its chocolate. What you might not know is that it hosts one of the elite Concours events. Hundreds of vehicles will be featured as well as other cool events. While you’re there, check out Hersheypark too!

Monterey Car Week

August 9 - 15, Friday – Thursday
Monterey, California

This is actually a collection of car events and they have a very busy calendar. It includes eight auctions, a number of shows, and the Concours d’LeMons which is loads of fun. Plus, you can’t beat the area with its gorgeous weather and breathtaking scenery.

Bonneville Speed Week

August 10-16, Saturday – Friday
Wendover, Utah

Don’t look for a luxurious setting here; it’s just a salt flat, a gathering of spectators, and some very fast, very cool cars. It is less than 90 miles from Salt Lake City, so if you prefer the comfort and excitement of the big city, you are right there.

Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

August 18, Sunday
Pebble Beach, California

This is the highlight of Automotive Week in Pebble Beach. The French word “concours” means “a parade of vintage vehicles” and it definitely lives up to its name. More than 200 collector vehicles, including motorcycles, will be showcased, along with a few surprises.

Classic Car Shows Overseas

If you plan to be abroad this summer, you may want to plan your schedule around one of these vintage car shows.

The 7th Peking to Paris Motor Challenge
June 2 – July 7
China to France Rally

Chantilly Arts et Élégance Richard Mille
July 30, Sunday

Château de Chantilly, Oise, France

Goodwood Festival of Speed
July 4 – 7, Thursday - Sunday
Goodwood House, Chichester, Sussex, UK

Whether you want a pristine show vehicle or a daily driver that turns heads wherever you go, Woodside Credit can help make it happen. Our easy terms and fast, friendly service make us one of the best classic car lenders around! Call or visit our website to learn more.

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There are some movies that are just made to draw exotic car lovers. Maybe it is intentional, maybe not. Whatever the case, there are times when the car in a film upstages the actors. These are our top five picks for great exotic cars in movies. These cars are striking, their stories interesting, and they are loaded to the gills with power. Enjoy.

Fast Five (2011)
Koenigsegg CCXR

Part of the “Fast and Furious” franchise, this movie provides plenty of automotive eye candy. This particular scene features the Koenigsegg CCXR and is actually considered to be one of the movie goofs. Roman boasts to his buddy Tej that his car is one of four in the world. A second Koenigsegg rolls up and Tej claims that he owns the second one. The problem is, Roman’s car is a Special Edition and Tej’s is not. There are plenty of CCXR cars out there, but only four Special Editions.

Cannonball Run (1981)
Lamborghini Countach LP5000S

The opening credits of this movie feature the Countach flying down the highway with a police car in hot pursuit. There’s just something about watching that black beauty, so low to the ground, hearing the whirr of the engine – it gets in your blood. The car in this firm had to undergo a few mods, both for vanity purposes and legal requirements. The addition of the front wing met a legal requirement that a vehicle’s front bumper had to be a certain height. The twelve exhaust pipes were for vanity.

Avengers: Endgame (2019)
Audi E-Tron GT

Superheroes are supposed to drive supercars, right? Well, the powers that be who created the latest Avengers movie sure think so. And viewers were not disappointed. You’ll find the Avenger’s/Audi ad here, because at the time of this writing the movie was still going strong in theaters. Nonetheless, you can still get a very satisfying eye full here with this electric SUV.

Speedracer (2008)
Mach V

Yes, we know that the Mach V in the movie was mostly CG, but we also know that a man in Florida decided to build his own Speedracer Mach V. Now that is one committed fan! And for that very reason it makes the list.

Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986)
Ferrari 250 GT

If ever a movie toyed with your emotions, this one does. In this iconic film we are introduced to this beautiful 1961 Ferrari, watch it cruise around town, see it get hot-rodded by a parking attendant who takes it for a joyride, then we witness the horror of it crashing. On some level you know it’s just a replica that is destroyed, but it still hurts your heart just a little.

You don’t have to be a movie star to own a star quality car. Let Woodside Credit help you get the car you want and terms you can live with. Contact us today or visit our site and complete a Quick Quote to see how low your payments could be!

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In 1970 the U.S. Congress passed the first Clean Air Act. This was a significant, aggressive step in setting goals for reducing auto emissions. It evoked an industry wide response as automakers added some of the first emissions control gear and detuned engines. It also initiated the end of the big horsepower era.

Big changes for passenger vehicles

It led to such changes as ethanol blended fuels and unleaded gasoline in vehicles and the end of motor oil that contained ZDDP. Early 1983 marked the first inspection and maintenance programs which were intended to target passenger vehicles in the most polluted areas of the country, ensuring that they were factory equipped with functional, appropriate emissions systems.

In 1990 the Clean Air Act was amended to provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with broader authority over vehicles and emissions. It required that oxygenated gas, such as ethanol, was sold in the U.S. cities that were the most polluted. It also regulated tailpipe emissions.

State Implementation Plan

While the NAAQA lays out the goals, it is up to each state to create its own State Implementation Plan, or SIP to meet those goals. Each state does have some degree of autonomy, but the plan must meet the approval of the EPA. This has resulted in a rather wide degree of variance on gas emissions from state to state.

Emissions and classic or collector cars

Studies have shown that doing emissions testing on classic or collector cars has very little impact on the environment. There is no measurable benefit to be noted simple because there are so very few compared to modern vehicles. Additionally, classic and collector cars are typically very well maintained and are not driven very often. This has prompted most states to provide certain exemptions that are specific to cars that fall into this category – older cars.

The best way to find out what the laws are in your state is to reach out to your local DMV. They have information on what cars are required to have emissions testing and which are exempt.

Overview of state by state requirements

Arizona

  • Testing in Pima and Maricopa Counties
  • Mostly statewide exemption that includes many classic and collector vehicles.

California

  • 1976 and newer required to be tested bi-annually in 34 counties
  • 1976 and newer required to be tested in 6 counties that are registered in specific ZIP codes – can be checked via smogcheck

Colorado

  • Motorcycles, farm vehicles, street rods, and horseless carriages are exempt
  • Other exemptions and requirements vary by year

Connecticut

  • Cars 25 years or older are exempt

Delaware

  • 1967 and older passenger vehicles are exempt.
  • 1968–1980 passenger vehicles must pass an idle tes
  • 1981 and newer, requirements vary

District of Columbia

  • All vehicles are required to pass one safety and emissions inspection. If a historic or classic car passes, they do not need to be tested again.

Florida

  • Does not have any current emissions testing requirements but awaiting state legislature approval to adopt California standards.

Georgia

  • 25 years old or older are exempt.

Idaho

  • 1965 and newer are required to be tested but this is in Ada County only.

Illinois

  • 1967 or older vehicles as well as street rods, custom vehicles, antique vehicles, and motorcycles are exempt.

Indiana

  • Vehicles built after 1975 are required to be tested (Lake County and Porter County only)
  • This rule is currently under review and revision.

Louisiana

  • Vehicles 40 years old or newer must pass a visual inspection, (includes viewing emissions equipment).
  • Vehicles 1996 or newer must pass an OBD-II emissions test (Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, Livingston and West Baton Rouge Parishes).

Maine

  • ALL cars registered in Cumberland County that are gasoline powered must be tested.

Maryland

  • 1976 and earlier vehicles are exempt.

Massachusetts

  • 1996 and earlier vehicles are exempt, but if the produce smoke that is visible, they will not pass the safety inspections.

Missouri

  • 1995 and older are exempt.

Nevada

  • Vehicles that are registered with old timer, classic rod, or classic vehicle license plates AND driven 2,500 miles or less per year are exempt.

New Hampshire

  • 20 years and older are exempt.
  • 1996 and older (but less than 20 years old) may be subject to a visual inspection during the safety inspection required by the state.

New Jersey

  • Vehicles registered as collector or historic are exempt.

New Mexico

1976 or newer are required to pass an emissions test (Bernalillo County only).

New York

  • Vehicles registered in the Upstate Area that do not require an emissions test:
    • With historical plates
    • Older than 25 years old
    • Homemade or custom vehicles

North Carolina

  • 1995 and earlier cars are exempt.

Ohio

  • Vehicles permanently exempt from testing:
    • 25 years or older
    • Registered as historical and collector vehicles
    • Parade and exhibition vehicles
    • Motorcycles

Oregon

  • 1975 and newer vehicles must pass an emissions test (Portland area)
  • 20 years old or newer are must be tested (Medford area).

Pennsylvania

Motorcycles and registered collectibles, street rods, and antiques are exempt.

Rhode Island

  • Vehicles exempt from emissions testing but must pass safety tests:
    • 25 years old or older with regular passenger plates
    • Registered with antique plates.

Tennessee

  • Vehicles older than 1975 and motorcycles and are exempt.

Texas

  • Vehicles 25 years and older are exempt.

Utah
Vehicles 1967 and older are exempt.

Vermont

  • Cars that do not have OBD-II equipment are exempt.

Virginia

  • Vehicles older than 25 years are exempt.

Washington

  • 25 years or older are exempt.

Wisconsin

  • Pre-1996 cars are exempt.

Emissions testing is not currently required in these states:

Alabama
Arkansas
Hawaii
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Montana
Nebraska
North Dakota
Oklahoma
South Carolina
South Dakota
Wyoming
West Virginia

At Woodside Credit we can’t change the laws on emissions testing, but we can make it super easy for you to add that sweet classic to your collection. Our easy terms and low payments put ownership well within your reach. Contact us today to learn more!

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